Rhetorical analysis of a more perfect union speech by obama

Constitution in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.

Rhetorical analysis of a more perfect union speech by obama

Neither that city nor year suggests a crucial event in American racial history. However, on March 18,at the National Constitution Center in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, soon-to-be President Barack Obama, a black man with an African father, took the stage and delivered a speech that would paint the racial landscape of his historic presidency.

In his speech, Obama welds three distinctive rhetorical tactics to support his overarching argument that unity is compulsory in this country to produce racial equality.

A Rhetorical Analysis of "A More Perfect Union" by Barack Ob by Claire Linn on Prezi

First, he opens with a personal and historical background to highlight the kairotic moment and exigence present, then appeals to pathos through multiple examples of racial injustice to indicate the necessity of such change, and finally uses his appeals to ethos to suggest, but not legislate, modes of change for black and white Americans.

The speech was met with profound success: To many, this speech was both a rhetorical and political turning point in the presidential campaign.

I was raised with the help of a white grandfather… I have brothers, sisters, nieces, nephews, uncles and cousins, of every race and every hue. In the weeks prior to the speech Wright, an outspoken Chicago pastor, accused the government of committing hateful acts against black Americans.

Rhetorical analysis of a more perfect union speech by obama

Conservatives flagged Wright as a militant black extremist, and, because he used to pray at his church, Obama was labeled similarly. In an effort to save face, while providing a more broad discourse on race in America, Obama had to act.

He states that past legislation has done little, and that more exhaustive measures are needed. As a result, generations of black failure build up, and, as demonstrated by the angry Reverend Wright, boil over.

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Finally, Obama uses his strong appeals to ethos to suggest, but not force, modes of change for black and white Americas.

His appeal to ethos lays in the fact that he has placed himself as a character in the racial history of America.

He is of a mixed-race background and was raised surrounded by racial inequality. Yet he is also a polished politician with a first class education.

As such, he is qualified to make his claims. And with force, he does.

Rhetorical analysis of a more perfect union speech by obama

Yet while he is qualified to make these claims, his suggestions have little backing. No one knows the key to racial equality, so why should a man only running for president tell us how to act? Obama swiftly evades this predicament by solely expressing broad suggestions instead of promising to enact certain legislation.

As such, he evades over stepping his boundaries, while still making justifiable claims. Obama uses his appeal to ethos to demonstrate the need for change, and suggest broad changes, but never surpasses his authority with grandiose ideals.

Under great pressure and circumstance did Barack Obama assume the podium on the 28th of March After his former preacher, Jeremiah Wright, provided the exigence for this discourse by claiming the American government treated blacks unfairly, Obama was forced to respond.“A More Perfect Union” is the name of a speech delivered by Senator Barack Obama on March 18, as a response to controversial remarks made by his former pastor, Reverend Jeremiah Wright/5(1).

“A More Perfect Union” by Barack Obama - A rhetorical analysis The speech called “A More Perfect Union” was delivered by the American senator Barack Obama on March 18, at a convention in Philadelphia. The speech titled “A More Perfect Union” was delivered by Senator Barack Obama on March 18, at the National Constitution Centerin Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.

The speech responds to the video of Barack Obama’s pastor, reverend Jeremiah Wright, in which Wright denounced the United States. Write a rhetorical analysis of either Oliver Twist, “I have a Dream”, “Bullet or the Ballot” or “A More Perfect Union”.

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You may compare two texts if you wish. 1 An influential and persuasive speech; a rhetorical analysis on Barack Obama`s “A More Perfect Union”.

Rhetorical Analysis of “A More Perfect Union” Speech The speech titled “A More Perfect Union” was delivered by Senator Barack Obama on March 18, near the historical site of the signing of the U.S.

Constitution in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. The effectiveness of Obama's speech rests upon four related rhetorical strategies: 1. The power of allusion and its patriotic associations.

2. The oratorical resonance of parallel constructions. 3.

Literatures and Foreign Languages: Rhetorical Analysis of “A More Perfect Union” Speech